For the 50+ Traveler

1
Rossignol Evo 70 Ski Boots (Men’s)

Top Pick
Check Latest Price

These sleek-looking Rossignol Evo 70 men’s ski boots have an average 4.5-star rating backed by numerous reviews that praise their quality, price point, and fit. The aesthetic is also appreciated by buyers.

The shell and cuff are both made of polyolefin plastic, while the removable liners are constructed from machined PU foam and warm, insulating wool. The boots’ polyurethane soles are replaceable. This could mean huge savings as replacing the soles will be a fraction of the cost of replacing your boots, plus it generates less waste.

The Rossignol Evo 70 Ski Boots rely on ratchet closures plus a comfort-fit hook-and-loop (think Velcro) band which are positioned to allow for easy entry. They come in Black/Red and Black/Yellow and have a flex rating of 70 and a 104 last.

Perhaps the most creative Evo 70 review reads, “Ripping 3s and hitting trees, baby, these boots are all I need.” For the record, “ripping 3s” refers to successfully landing 360-degree spins, which might not be in your repertoire right now, but maybe it will be after a few ski trips with your comfy new boots.

Key Features

  • 3 ratchet closures
  • Polyolefin shell and cuff
  • Flex: 70, Last: 104

Specifications

  • Brand: Rossignol
  • Sizing: Men’s
  • Currently available in: Sizes 30.5 to 32.5

Pros

  • Removable liners
  • Replaceable soles
  • Easy-entry design

Cons

  • Limited sizes available
  • Price varies significantly based on size
  • Wool might be a deterrent for some buyers

2
Tecnica Ten.2 70 HVL Ski Boots

Honorable Mention
Check Latest Price

Tecnica’s Ten.2 70 HVL Ski Boots are very similar to Rossignol’s Evo 70 ski boots in that they have a polyolefin shell and cuff, a flex rating of 70, and ratchet closures plus a hook-and-loop band near the top. That said, the liner looks significantly thicker (though it’s unclear whether they’re removable) and the Tecnica Ten.2s have four ratchet closures instead of three, which means a more customized fit. They have a slightly narrower 102-millimeter last and leverage Tecnica’s Quick Instep Max technology to get you into your boots and on the slopes faster.

The majority of reviewers, who give the boots an average 4.3 out of 5 stars, love the fit and note that they’re a great deal on Amazon. Unfortunately, some buyers say they’re too narrow, and it looks like they’re only available in one color combination: red on black.

Color combo scarcity aside, one reviewer, who says she’s been skiing for 21 years, reports that the Ten.2 70 HVL ski boots felt like they molded perfectly to her wide feet and that she’s been happy with their performance despite being accustomed to skiing in boots with 100 to 130 flex ratings.

Key Features

  • 4 ratchet closures
  • Polyolefin shell and cuff
  • Flex: 70, Last: 102

Specifications

  • Brand: Tecnica
  • Sizing: Unisex
  • Currently available in: Sizes 25.5 to 30.5

Pros

  • Comfortable, well-cushioned liner that molds to skiers feet
  • Quick Instep Max technology
  • More ratchet closures mean more customizable fit

Cons

  • Not clear if liner is removable
  • Too narrow for some buyers
  • Price varies considerably based on size

3
Envy Ski Boot Frame

Also Consider
Check Latest Price

These frames from Envy Snow Sports aren’t ski boots per se, but they are the best option if you have a pair of snowboarding boots that you love (check out our best snowboarding boots roundup here) and you want the option to ski, too. These innovative, ratchet-strapped “frames” accommodate single-BOA and traditional lace-up snowboarding boots. You literally walk into them with your boots on, ratchet them up, and click into your skis.

Envy Snow Sports notes that it’s much safer and more comfortable to walk around in snowboarding boots than it in ski boots, and at least one satisfied buyer says he hopes he never goes back to ski boots again (and notes that, happily, these frames are compatible with ski blade bindings in addition to traditional ski bindings).

Note that this ski boot alternative is not compatible with any snowboarding boots that have double-BOA closures. Also, the frames are not boot-size specific. Instead, they come in medium (for men’s boots sized 5 to 8.5, women’s 6 to 9.5) and large (for men’s boots sized 9 to 13 and women’s 10 and up).

Reviewers say these really do afford them increased comfort, however, they are not best for skiers doing more intense runs as they’ll require more support than snowboarding boots provide.

Key Features

  • Compatible with most single-BOA and traditional lace-up snowboarding boots
  • Ratchet strap closures

Specifications

  • Brand: Envy Snow Sports
  • Sizing: Unisex
  • Currently available in: Medium and Large

Pros

  • Allow you to get more use out of your snowboarding boots and enjoy skiing, too
  • Compatible with most skis and ski blades
  • More comfortable than your typical ski boot

Cons

  • Not actually boots; you must have snowboarding boots to use with these frames
  • Not compatible with double-BOA snowboarding boots
  • Not supportive enough for skiers who want to do intense runs

4
Rossignol Kelia 50 Ski Boots (Women’s)

Check Latest Price

These women’s-fit boots have an average 4.9-star rating. Reviewers agree that they’re incredibly comfortable, one even calling them “the most comfortable boots for wide feet ever,” which is high praise considering she’s an advanced skier who would typically opt for narrower boots with less flex. “But who cares when there’s no pain?” she asks. Touche.

The boots have three ratchet closures (plus a hook-and-loop band near the top), shorter cuffs that are designed to alleviate pressure around the shins and calves, and liners that are designed for custom support. The wider 104-millimeter last promises a comfier fit as well.

Rossignol’s Sensor Matrix shell reduces the boots’ weight and, according to the company, allows “direct-to-ski” energy transfer. Finally, like Rossignol’s Evo 70 men’s ski boots, the Kelia 50 boots’ soles are replaceable, which means you can spruce them up, no need to buy brand new boots when they get a little worn.

Note that while buyers really like these boots (they haven’t received anything lower than a 4-star rating), one noted that they squeak a bit, which could detract from your one-with-nature experience, if that’s what you’re after.

Key Features

  • 3 ratchet closures
  • Lightweight Sensor Matrix shell
  • Flex: Not specified, Last: 104

Specifications

  • Brand: Rossignol
  • Sizing: Women’s
  • Currently available in: 23.5 to 27.5

Pros

  • More comfortable fit thanks to well-cushioned liner and shorter cuffs
  • Replaceable soles

Cons

  • Not clear if liner is removable
  • May be a bit squeaky

5
SALOMON QST Access 60 Ski Boots (Women’s)

Check Latest Price

These new-age-looking boots come at a premium -- and with a lot of fancy features. In addition to the three-ratchet-strap-plus-hook-and-loop-band closure they have in common with the Rossignol boots we’ve featured, these ski boots are lined with highly moldable foam and have a hinged cuff, which allows for their unique “hike mode.”

They’re also made of a softer shell material that contributes to them being lighter and more forgiving. The liner, in addition to its moldable foam, leverages “woolmetal,” a wool and metallic polyester blend that promises warmer feet for the duration of your outdoor time. Like the Rossignol Kelia 50 women’s ski boots, SALOMON’s QST Access 60 boots have what SALOMON calls their Women’s Specific Low Cuff, which more comfortably accommodates the calves and is less likely to irritate the shins.

Finally, these boots are made by SALOMON, a trusted French sporting equipment company. While they have very few reviews, they’re backed by SALOMON’s history, plus its commitment to imagination, espirit de famille, and simplicity in its designs and beyond.

Key Features

  • 3 ratchet closures
  • My Custom Fit Comfort foam liner
  • Hinged cuff that allows for unique hike mode

Specifications

  • Brand: SALOMON
  • Sizing: Women’s
  • Currently available in: 23 to 27.5

Pros

  • Made by a well-established French sporting equipment company
  • Moldable foam liner
  • Extra warm woolmetal used in lining

Cons

  • Flex and last not listed
  • More expensive than other featured options
  • Wool might be a deterrent for some buyers
Related:

You could just rent ski boots when you get where you’re going. But then, remember that boots can make or break a skiing experience. Having your own boots ensures a trusted fit and a new relationship. Each time you put them on, you’ll remember that last time on the slopes. Ideally, you’ll grow in confidence with this same pair of boots for years to come. Of course, that possibility is predicated on getting the best ski boots for you. Here are a few things to consider as you make your selection.

Closure Mechanism

Most modern ski boots close with ratcheting straps plus a hook-and-loop (often called Velcro, even if it’s not the name brand) band around the top. There’s little variety here, but what can change from boot to boot is the number of ratcheting straps. More straps means more control over how loose or tight your boots are from spot to spot. If you want to have greater control over your fit, consider a boot with more ratcheting straps rather than fewer.

Cuff Height

A higher boot cuff means a more locked-in feeling. Many women’s-fit boots have lower and wider cuffs to more comfortably accommodate the calves and avoid irritating the shins. Of course, this also means less support on the slopes. While ski boot sizing has its own numeric system which isn’t gendered, and some ski boots are unisex, cuff height may be a good reason to opt for gender-specific boots.

Flex

Most ski and snowboarding boots are assigned flex ratings. These address how stiff or flexible the boots are. Stiffer boots are more supportive and are typically worn by more experienced skiers taking on more challenging slopes and runs. More flexible boots are more comfortable but aren’t as supportive and could actually be unsafe for the feet and ankles.

Note that flex ratings are not streamlined across brands, so they are essentially suggestions or guidelines, not scientific measurements. All the boots in our roundup are on the more flexible side as they’re best suited to recreational skiers.

Last

Ski boots’ last measurements indicate, in millimeters, how wide they are at their widest point. Typically, the wider the last, the more comfortable the boot will feel. Of course, a too-wide last will result in a sloppy fit, which can be equally uncomfortable and actually unsafe for the feet and ankles. More experienced skiers may train their feet to boots with narrower lasts, but recreational skiers will want boots with wider lasts that will accommodate socks and a bit of movement.

Liner

A quality liner will keep your feet warm, and the best ski boots often boast liners that will mold to your feet thanks to high-tech foam. Some liners have wool, which can definitely hold heat, but will be a deterrent for buyers who don’t want animal materials in their boots. Also consider whether you want boots with removable liners, which can speed drying.

Categories
.